Comment on: A complex microbiota from snowball Earth times: Microfossils from the Neoproterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley, USA

TitleComment on: A complex microbiota from snowball Earth times: Microfossils from the Neoproterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley, USA
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsCorsetti F.A, Awramik S.M, Pierce D.
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume100
Issue8
Pagination4399 - 4404
Date Published04/15/2003
Other Numbers05Maloof
Abstract

A thin carbonate unit associated with a Sturtian-age (750–700 million years ago) glaciogenic diamictite of the Neoproterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, eastern California, contains microfossil evidence of a once-thriving prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial community (preserved in chert and carbonate). Stratiform stromatolites, oncoids, and rare columnar stromatolites also occur. The microbial fossils, which include putative autotrophic and heterotrophic eukaryotes, are similar to those found in chert in the underlying preglacial units. They indicate that microbial life adapted to shallow-water carbonate environments did not suffer the significant extinction postulated for this phase of low-latitude glaciation and that trophic complexity survived through snowball Earth times.

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URLhttps://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0730560100
DOI10.1073/pnas.0730560100
Short TitleProc Natl Acad Sci USA