Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2020

Sedimentology
This course presents a treatment of the physical and chemical processes that shape Earth's surface, such as solar radiation, deformation of the solid Earth, and the flow of water (vapor, liquid, and solid) under the influence of gravity. In particular,the generation, transport, and preservation of sediment in response to these processes is studied in order to better read stories of Earth history in the geologic record and to better understand processes involved in modern and ancient environmental change.
Instructors: Adam C. Maloof

Freshman Seminar

Fall 2020

FRS 161

Earth: Crops, Culture, and Climate (in Italy)

INSTRUCTORS: 
Adam Maloof and Frederik Simons

This seminar is about natural science and technology, and has a laboratory component to it: students should come prepared with an aptitude for, and a willingness to learn, the quantitative aspects of scientific inquiry and numerical modeling. Scientific writing and computer programming are integral parts of this seminar and its assessment. We teach and require the use of LaTeX—annoying now, helpful later on. MORE INFO


 

Previous Freshman Seminars

FRS 124 (Spring '17) and FRS 135 (Fall '15 & '17)
State of the Earth: Shifts and Cycles

INSTRUCTORS:
Adam Maloof and Frederik Simons
This is a science class: students came prepared with an aptitude for, and a willingness to learn, the quantitative aspects of scientific inquiry. Scientific writing and computer programming are integral parts of this seminar and its assessment. We teach and require the use of LaTeX!   MORE INFO

STUDENT COURSE EVALUATIONS


FRS 171 & 187 (Fall '11, '12 & '13)
Earth's Environments and Ancient Civilizations

INSTRUCTORS: 
Adam C. Maloof and Frederik J. Simons
In this Freshman Seminar, you combine field observations of the natural world with quantitative modeling and interpretation in order to answer questions like: How does environmental change alter the course of civilization, and how do civilizations modify their environment? How have Earth and human histories been recorded in the geology and archaeology of Cyprus, and what experiments can we do to query such archives of the past? In the classroom, through problem sets, and on campus excursions, you gain practical experience collecting geological and geophysical data in geographic context, and analyzing these data using software and programming languages like ArcGIS and MATLAB.   MORE INFO

STUDENT COURSE EVALUATIONS


FRS 149 & 145 (Fall '07, '08 & '09)
Earth's Changing Surface and Climate
INSTRUCTORS:

Adam C. Maloof and Frederik J. Simons

The surface of Earth today, an amalgamation of mountain ranges, basins, and the hydrosphere, records an integrated history of processes that act on a range of time scales spanning seventeen orders of magnitude. The central question treated in this Freshman Seminar is: How does Earth's surface evolve in response to internal (e.g., tectonic and magmatic), surficial (e.g., weather, climate, and anthropogenic effects), and external (e.g., extraterrestrial) forcing?    MORE INFO

STUDENT COURSE EVALUATIONS

 

Previous Courses List

GEO 201 (Fall 2018)

Measuring Climate Change: Methods in Data Analysis and Scientific Writing

Students will use drone-derived models of landscapes, georeferenced field observations of the natural world, and data mining of the primary literature in combination with quantitative modeling to answer questions like: How have ancient climate changes been preserved in modern landscapes and the rock record? How is climate changing now, and how do we measure it? Designed for sophomores in preparation for independent work, the course emphasizes the articulation of a compelling hypothesis and the development of a clearly structured argument based on data, analysis, and engagement with relevant sources.

INSTRUCTORS: 
Amanda E. Irwin Wilkins
Adam C. Maloof